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Does cooperating with a co-parent help your child?

| Aug 25, 2020 | Child Custody

Texas parents like you want what is best for your child. This does not change because you are going through a divorce. In fact, you want more than ever to keep your child in a safe environment and healthy mental state.

There are many ways you can go about this, but cooperation with a co-parent may act as the simplest among them. It may surprise you to learn how big of an impact cooperation can have.

Wait to speak with your child

KidsHealth discusses the importance of the decisions you make during divorce. In particular, they talk about how you present your relationship with your co-parent. In divorce, it is hard to keep a level head. Emotions often run rampant, tensions spike, and you may say or do things you later regret.

This is why the first tip is to save conversations with your kid until after things have calmed down. Do not approach your child right after an argument, as they will likely pick up on the lingering tension. Instead, you should present a calm and level-headed front. Even if you cannot behave in a friendly way with your co-parent just yet, you can behave in a civil way.

The importance of information sharing

Cooperation between parents allows you to share information better, too. Children often end up confused and distraught when parents present different information. By cooperating, you can get on the same page with what you want to share. Decide what to leave out, what to simplify and what is fine to speak about outright.

Your child gains a sense of stability through these actions. Fear of the unknown spurs most negative reactions and trauma children have. In knowing they can still rely on you as parents, some of that fear vanishes.

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